Real Estate in the Grafton MA Area | Barbara Rybicki - RE/MAX Executive Realty


That kitchen sink faucet needed replacing for a while, but between the cost of the new faucet and the cost of paying the hourly rate of the plumber and his helper, it is still the same old faucet. It works—sort-of—at least water comes out. Then, while watching one of those shows (that is either remodeling a house to live in or to flip and make some money), you see them change out the kitchen faucet, and you say to yourself, "I can do that.” 

So, the adventure begins.

On the surface, changing out a faucet does not seem like such a challenging project. However, if you are not doing plumbing on a regular basis, it can get more complicated. The first step is that you have to buy the faucet you want that will look good. That seems simple enough, but there are holes already drilled in the sink or the countertop, so you must get a faucet that will fit those. There are two ways to size the holes: either remove the old fixture or get under the sink to measure the distance between the holes. (This is particularly important if this is an older home.) 

Now to do the work.

Removing the faucet requires crawling under the sink. 

  • First, remove all of that stuff stored under there.
  • Turn off the hot and cold water. If there are no valves under the sink, you need to find the master valve for the house. (If this is the situation, you might decide to install valves while you’re at it, but remember, you are not a plumber, so that might be biting off more than you can chew.)
  • Now you find that the drain pipes are in your way of trying to get under the sink to reach the backside. So, you decide to remove them to get around under there. Seems logical right? Unfortunately, you find that someone else that is not a plumber replaced those drain lines and did not put them back correctly so now you are going to have to replace those.
  • Back to the faucet you finally get the water lines removed and the nuts holding the faucet to the sink. (They're corroded—apparently, there had been a leak at some point). 

Following the instructions that came with the faucet, you get it attached to the sink, and it looks GREAT! Unfortunately, you go to connect the waterlines, and the ends do not match the faucet. So, you remove the waterlines from the inlet valve and head to the DIY store to find new lines that will fit. You also remember to take all of that drain pipe with you because you are going to need to replace it and make it fit correctly.

Wrap it up!

Now you have the new parts you can get the water attached and the drain pipes reconnected. The drain pipes look a lot different, but they work, and they do not leak. Congratulations to you! 

You have finally replaced that old faucet. It looks good, but bummer it took you all Saturday morning and then some. Maybe you should have paid that plumber for an hour. You could have done something more fun. Plumbing is one of those DIY things that when you do not do it all of the time, you NEVER have the correct pieces and you end up making several trips to the store. You are not alone.

The choice is yours: spend money or spend time. DIY can be satisfying or frustrating, so remember to start a project with your eyes open to what could be involved. Good luck! 

For a referral to a qualified plumber, check with your real estate professional.


A home seller may dread the thought of dealing with an aggressive property buyer, i.e. an individual who submits many requests for property improvements or price reductions prior to the closing of a home sale. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of dealing with an aggressive homebuyer.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a home seller get the best-possible results when he or she deals with an aggressive property buyer.

1. Keep Your Cool

Let's face it – an aggressive homebuyer may test your patience. But if you remain calm, cool and collected when you deal with an aggressive homebuyer, you may be better equipped than ever before to accomplish your desired home selling results.

Remember, the ultimate goal of the house selling journey is to maximize your property sale earnings. If you remain open to communication with a buyer, both you and this individual can work together to find common ground. And as a result, you and a buyer can collaborate to achieve the optimal results.

2. Know Your Options

If a buyer makes exorbitant requests during the home selling journey, it is important to keep in mind that you have options. And if problems start to escalate, you may be able to walk away from a property selling agreement.

For example, if an aggressive buyer conducts a home inspection and asks for a massive price reduction following the evaluation, you can still negotiate with this buyer. And if you and the buyer cannot come to terms, there is no need to stress. At this point, you can move on from a potential home sale and re-list your residence.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

Dealing with an aggressive homebuyer can be worrisome. For sellers who want to avoid the potential dangers associated with dealing with an aggressive buyer, it may be beneficial to hire a real estate agent.

In addition to guiding you along the property selling journey, a real estate agent is happy to help you negotiate with a buyer and his or her agent. That way, you can boost the likelihood of enjoying a quick, profitable house selling experience.

Typically, a real estate agent will serve as a liaison between you and a buyer. And if a buyer requests property upgrades or a price reduction prior to closing day, a real estate agent can offer recommendations about how to proceed with these requests.

A real estate agent also is available to respond to any of your home selling concerns or questions. This housing market professional understands the property selling experience can cause a seller to worry, especially if this individual is forced to deal with an aggressive buyer. But with a real estate agent's assistance, a seller can take the necessary steps to minimize potential property selling hurdles.

Simplify a negotiation with an aggressive homebuyer – use the aforementioned tips, and any home seller can seamlessly navigate a negotiation with any buyer, at any time.


Most people enjoy surrounding themselves with bright colors. Blues, purples, reds, and greens add personality to your home and bring you joy. They may set off your furniture or your favorite art. When you decorate your own home, you tend towards colors and styles that make you happy. However, as you've probably noticed even in your own family, different colors have different means for each person. While you might love that salmon pink wall, your potential buyer might not be able to get past the cat-food reference.

In addition to simple preference, an estimated ten percent or more of the population suffers from some form of color blindness, and most of them don't even realize it. Two main kinds of color blindness exist: you've probably heard of the more common red/green color blindness, but a blue/yellow color blindness exists as well that confuses blue and yellow with violet. That means the gorgeous pale yellow you chose might look like a bright violet to them. If a buyer knows about their color blindness, they plan for it, but most sufferers have no idea, they've just always seen colors this way.

You don’t want to turn off a promising buyer because you chose colors that were too bright, or didn’t account for variations in color blindness. A lot of buyers may not actually be color blind, but instead, become blinded by your palette. If buyers can't visualize the room with their belongings and their family, they won't want to purchase the home.

The Solution: Go Neutral

In the past, real estate and staging professionals used to solve this problem by asking clients to paint their entire home white. While white will still work, you can also benefit from using one of the other modern neutral tones. These off-white and gray sophisticated palettes can compliment your existing furniture and architectural features. Paint manufacturers and interior designers are always trying new neutral tones by adding warm or cool undertones to whites and grays. Check out the latest palettes for your season and use them to keep some color, dimension, and depth to your walls without overpowering your potential buyers' ability to picture the home the way they want it.

One long-lasting trend is to use some darker neutral on the walls balanced by bright white trim. This combination has a brightening effect around window and doors and evokes a warm response in many buyers. Make sure to check the trends in your area, since some regions will prefer one set of neutrals over another. In some areas, soft blues and greens work well for neutral tones.

Talk to your local real estate professional about the best painting choices for your property before investing in ten gallons of white.


Do you know home selling lingo? If not, miscommunications may arise that prevent you from maximizing the value of your house. Perhaps even worse, you risk making poor home selling decisions due to the fact that you don't fully understand the real estate terms included in a home sale agreement.

Fortunately, we're here to bring clarity to assorted home selling terms that you may encounter as you proceed along the home selling journey.

Let's take a look at three common home selling terms that every property seller needs to know.

1. Depreciation

Over time, the value of your home may deteriorate due to age, wear and tear and other problems. This is referred to as "depreciation," and depreciation ultimately may impact your ability to get the best price for your house.

To find out how much your house's value has depreciated, it may be worthwhile to conduct a home appraisal before you list your residence. That way, you can analyze your house's strengths and weaknesses. You also can uncover innovative ways to boost your home's appearance both inside and out, thereby ensuring you can set the optimal initial asking price for your residence.

2. House Closing

A house closing refers to the final transfer of ownership from home seller to homebuyer. Thus, once you and a homebuyer are ready to dot the I's and cross the T's on a home sale agreement, you'll complete the house closing process.

During a house closing, all terms of a contract between a home seller and homebuyer must be met. Moreover, the home deed will be recorded, and the house will finally be sold.

The house closing is a key part of the home selling cycle. At this point, a home seller will receive final payment for a house and transfer ownership of the property to the buyer.

3. Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent plays a pivotal role in the home selling process, and for good reason. If you hire an expert real estate agent, you should have no trouble navigating the home selling journey.

Typically, a real estate agent handles all of the tasks associated with listing and selling a house. This housing market professional will help you promote your residence to potential homebuyers, host open houses and home showings and even negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf. Plus, if you receive an offer on a home, a real estate agent can offer honest, unbiased recommendations about whether to accept or reject the proposal.

You don't need to look far to find a qualified real estate agent in your area, either.

Real estate agents are employed across the United States. In fact, if you interview multiple real estate agents in your area, you can find a real estate agent who makes you feel comfortable and confident about selling your house.

Allocate the necessary time and resources to learn various home selling terms. With a clear understanding of home selling terms, you can avoid potential pitfalls throughout the home selling journey.


Ready to buy a home? You'll likely need a mortgage to ensure you can afford your dream residence. Lucky for you, many banks and credit unions are happy to help you discover a mortgage that suits you perfectly.

Ultimately, meeting with a mortgage lender may seem stressful at first. But this meeting can serve as a valuable learning opportunity, one that allows you to select a mortgage that is easy to understand and matches your budget.

When you meet with a mortgage lender, here are three of the questions to ask so you can gain the insights you need to make an informed decision:

1. What mortgage options are available?

Most lenders offer a broad range of mortgage options. By doing so, these lenders can help you choose a mortgage that meets or exceeds your expectations.

Fixed-rate mortgages represent some of the most popular options for homebuyers, and perhaps it is easy to understand why. These mortgages lock-in an interest rate for a set period of time and ensure your mortgage payments will stay the same throughout the duration of your mortgage.

Meanwhile, adjustable-rate mortgages may prove to be great choices for many homebuyers as well. These mortgages may feature a lower initial interest rate that rises after several years. However, with an adjustable-rate mortgage, you'll know when your mortgage's interest rate will increase and can plan accordingly.

2. Do I need to get pre-approved for a mortgage?

Pre-approval for a mortgage usually is an excellent idea, and for good reason.

If you get pre-approved for a mortgage, you may be able to enter the homebuying market with a budget in mind. That way, you can pursue houses that fall within a set price range and avoid the risk of overspending on a home.

On the other hand, you don't need to be pre-approved for a mortgage to submit an offer on a home. But with a mortgage in hand, you may be able to gain an advantage over the competition, one that might even lead a home seller to select your offer over others.

3. How long will a mortgage last?

Many mortgages last 15- or 30-years – it all depends on the type of mortgage that you select.

A lender can explain the length associated with various mortgage options and highlight the pros and cons associated with these mortgages.

Moreover, you should ask a lender if there are any prepayment penalties if you pay off your mortgage early. This may help you determine whether a particular mortgage is right for you.

When it comes to finding a lender, don't forget to meet with several banks and credit unions. This will allow you to discover a lender that offers a mortgage with a low interest rate. Plus, it enables you to find a lender that makes you feel comfortable.

If you need assistance in your search for the right lender, be sure to reach out to a real estate agent. This housing market professional can provide details about local lenders and ensure you can accelerate your push to acquire your dream residence.




Loading